Thursday, March 26, 2015

NOW ON DUTY: MATT TUCKER





Bartender extraordinaire



TONIGHT: KARAOKE WITH WHIT!!!





After a spot of spring cleaning, we are ready to rock & roll.

Join us tonight, to sing, or just to enjoy our regular, very talented crooners.

On duty tonight:  Darren.


Wednesday, March 25, 2015

WELCOME MATT TUCKER







Matt has been tending bar in Santa Barbara since 1996, starting at Brophy's.

When Lucky's first opened, Matt was there behind the bar, and remained for twelve years.

For two years thereafter, Matt shook cocktails at the Uptown.

We are delighted to welcome Matt as our main daytime bartender.

He is as good as it gets.

Please visit Matt Thursday through Sunday from 2 p.m. through 7 p.m.



A JOYFUL BAR






KARAOKE @ PLAY





One of our many amazing karaoke krooners!!!



BARTENDER @ PLAY





Darren, feeling back at home behind the bar.


TRIO: LADIES @ PLAY





BOOMIN'!





Cool vibes & good cheer!



Monday, March 16, 2015

UN-PAPPIED






Says one of our vendors:

We must order seven cases of Platinum 7-X vodka to allow us the privilege of buying one bottle of Pappy Van Winkle.


NO THANKS!





Saturday, March 14, 2015

TONIGHT @ BoHenry's







PROFESSOR NUTT'S HANGOVER PILLS





A professor at Imperial College London is trying to come up with a pill that could cure hangovers quickly.
Professor David Nutt, who is neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London, is working on two 'wonder drugs' that could help hangovers.
The first is called Chaperone, and it reduces the effects of alcohol on the body and if made widely available, the pill could be used as a quick way to sober up after a night out and may even reduce the risk of drink driving, although Nutt notes that the price would need to be set high to avoid abuse.
The second drug is called 'alscosynth'.
It is a non-toxic inebriate drink which mimics the euphoric sensation of being drunk, but significantly reduces other less welcome side effects of alcohol such as hangovers, aggression, loss of control and generally embarrassing behavior.



Thursday, March 12, 2015

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

HANGOVER REMEDIES






Tip #1 - Virgin Bloody Mary 
According to Dr. Travis of the show, drinking too much alcohol can lead to toxic build up of a component called acetaldehyde. The doctor suggests drinking a virgin Bloody Mary, which contain egg yolks and esparagus.  According to "The Drs" show -- seen in the video below -- drinking hair of the dog will only add to the alcohol level of the body, not decrease it.  
He explains that egg yolks contain cysteine, which helps break down acetaldehyde. He later adds that esparagus helps break down the toxins as well. 
Tip #2 - Drink Gatorade
Fitness Magazine states drinking sports drinks such as, Gatorade or Powerade, will help with a hangover. The site reports that sports drinks contain electrolytes that help replenish and restore system levels in the body. The drinks also contain sugar that give the body carbohydrates for energy.  
Tip #3 - Eat Light
There is a widely believed myth that eating greasy food can help with alcohol in-take, reports Health. However, Dr. Cutler states, "Greasy food is just going to give you heartburn."  
Dr. John Brick, author of "The Doctor's Hangover Handbook", advises people to eat light and stay hydrated to prevent a hangover. 
Tip #4 - Over-The-Counter Paracetamol
NHS Choice advises people with hangovers to take "paracetamol-based remedies" because it will not further irritate the stomach or increase nausea as oppose to an aspirin.  
Tip #5 - Soup
According to NHS Choice, having some Bouillon soup could help with a hangover because it is a good source of vitamins and minerals. The soup is also easy on the stomach, which is a big plus.
Tip #6 - Skip the Sauna
Some people think that sweating out the toxins from alcohol can help relieve a hangover, reports Health. However, according to the Finnish State Alcohol Company's Research Laboratories, sauna bathing can cause blood pressures to drop and abnormal heart rhythms.
Tip #7 - Don't Exercise
Believe it or not, some people actually exercise to relieve their hangovers. However, Dr. Cutler from Health says exercising with a hangover is ill-advised.  
The doctor says, "Remember: If you've been drinking heavily, you could be a little dehydrated, you could be metabolically behind on your nutrition, and exercise is going to require hydration and nutrition."   
Tip #8: Sleep 
According to Fitness Magazine sleeping off a hangover might just be the best solution. The site reports that metabolizing alcohol is the best way to get rid of a hangover, so why not sleep while the body does its work.    



Monday, March 9, 2015

STUMBLING THROUGH AMERICAN HISTORY WITH BOOZE




Franklin Roosevelt's daily set-up


U.S. history does not walk a straight line when it comes to the country’s relationship with alcohol.
Americans have fluctuated between times when whiskey was as common to the breakfast table as coffee and other periods when an evening cocktail was considered a social taboo.
The National Archives Museum is now raising a toast to the nation’s complicated history with booze with the debut of a new exhibit, aptly titled “Spirited Republic.”
“The amount of alcohol we consumed went way up as the society became more individualistic, and the frontier became more prominent,” curator Bruce Bustard told “Power Players” on a sneak peek tour of the exhibit, which opens Friday.
Standing in front of a display that measures how many gallons worth of alcohol the average American drank over time, the year 1830 towers above the rest. “In 1830, we consumed about 7.1 gallons of alcohol per person who was of legal age,” Bustard said.
To put the 1830 figure in perspective, that’s about two-and-half times today’s national average.



Saturday, March 7, 2015

THE WORLD'S OLDEST KNOWN ALCOHOLIC DRINK





"Mead has come and gone through the centuries. It was originally referred to as ambrosia and was nectar to the gods in Greek mythology," says Mark Maxwell, whose McLaren Vale vineyard is the largest mead producer in the southern hemisphere. "It's the first recognised alcoholic drink in history ... mead was drunk before wine."
The drink is traditionally made by fermenting honey with water and adding fruits and spices, resulting in a rowdy brew with an alcohol content of anywhere between 5-20 per cent. 
It's also surprisingly the origin of a very well known part of modern life - the honeymoon.
"It was a custom for a Viking bridegroom to drink a goblet of mead on his wedding night - and for the month after he was married - to make sure he sired children," explains Maxwell. "That became known as the 'honey month' which we now know as the honeymoon."